Fitzgerald Key- Back to the Basics - August 13th, 2012

The Fitzgerald Color Coding Key was developed by Edith Fitzgerald in 1929 originally to teach hearing impaired individuals.  The basic idea behind the key was a color coding classifying system for the different parts of speech.  Since grammar is such an abstract concept, Edith Fitzgerald came up with the idea of adding color to classify grammar.  This allowed individuals with language difficulties a way of distinguishing the different parts of speech from one another.  The book titled- Straight Language for Deaf by Edith Fitzgerald is the original source.  An excellent speech therapy resource for speech therapists.

 

Straight Language for the Deaf. A system of instruction for deaf children. By Edith Fitzgerald. 1949 Edition. Ex-library Edition. 104 pages

 

This blog entry is meant to be a starting point.  Current spin off ideas on the market are the Pixon Project and Minspeak.  In addition, when creating communication boards one finds that keeping vocabulary in a color coded system is commonly found as well.  There are even apps available for purchase using the Fitzgerald Key.

 

We are in the process of writing a blog entry on the Pixon Project…the modern Fitzgerald Color Coding Key!

 

Below is a comprehensive list of the best available resources and printables found on the internet to date.

 

EASYBEE’S GUIDE to FITZGERALD KEY’S on the INTERNET:

 

 

IPAD APPS-

Rainbow Sentences

 

 

INSTANT PRINTABLE FITZGERALD KEY COMMUNICATION BOARDS-

 

 

BLOG ENTRIES-

1- ADAPTING CREATIVELY

 

2- TALK SENSE

 

 

3- AAC INSTITUTE- PARENT’S CORNER

 

 

4- BBB AUTISM

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